Strategic Plan

The five-year goals for the Dane County Department of Human Services form the foundation for the Department to improve outcomes to those it serves and strengthen the core competencies of the organization. The Department’s goals focus on four areas: improving the lives of the individuals it serves; improving the performance of its systems and its ability to publicly report on that performance; improving its financial health; and improving its organizational effectiveness and infrastructure.

Assess and enhance the Department’s service outcomes.

Work Plan – Administration

Initiative Area
Documentation of job functions
Current Status
Currently there is significant longevity of staff in the payroll area. The accounting area has experienced more staff turnover in recent years. There is little or no documentation as to how the payroll and accounting areas work. There is a lack of job descriptions and written detail of the functions of each position. This makes it difficult for someone to step into a job when there is a vacancy or when an essential function like payroll needs to be covered.
Chosen Target
Written documentation of job descriptions and detailed functions of all positions in the payroll and accounting areas. Documentation will include detailed instructions of how jobs are completed.
Tactics to Close the Gap
  • Establish a standard format for gathering the information.
  • Have staff write up procedures for their various responsibilities.
  • Review and approve documentation.
  • Update as necessary.
Measures of Success
Written documentation is completed for all payroll and accounting positions.
Lead Staff Responsible
Patty Hillebrand
Initiative Area
Baker Tilly POS Contract Assessment Recommendations
Current Status

In the Office of the Dane County Board of Supervisors contracted with Baker Tilly Virchow Krause, LLP to conduct an analysis of the Department’s current approach to Purchase of Service Contracting with an eye to future planning as well.

A final report was released in that included 23 recommendations. The Chair of the Health and Human Needs Committee asked the Department to gather input from staff to determine a priority order for working through the report recommendations.

Chosen Target
The Department will systematically address recommendations from the POS Contract Process Assessment Final Report.
Tactics to Close the Gap
  • Surveyed staff who participated in the audit process to rank each recommendation based on perceived need and ease of implementation.
  • Responses were plotted on a decision matrix.
  • Responses were scored on those same criteria and a total of 9 recommendations were chosen to begin our work.
  • A work plan was developed that included initiatives to address the recommendation.
  • Baker Tilly Work Plans will be maintained separately to enable better tracking of progress.
  • Work plan progress is reported out in July and shared with HHN and with the DCDHS/POS Leadership group.
  • As initiatives are completed new recommendations are added.
Measures of Success
  • Progress on current initiatives is reported out on an annual basis (July).
  • The Department completes its work on all recommendations.
Lead Staff Responsible
Jean Kuehn – ongoing

Work Plan – Adult Community Services

Initiative Area
Increase utilization of the Bus Buddy and Mobility Training Programs, which train individuals to independently use fixed-route public transit, local shared-ride taxis and county-funded group transportation services.
Current Status
  • In , Dane County funded these two travel training programs at a maintenance level, after losing New Freedom (Sec. 5317) funding for them.
  • In , a new funding source (expanded Sec. 5310) was identified and it was anticipated the programs would receive increased referrals, due to a newly-funded Metro Transit In-Person Assessment (IPA) project. There were some referrals, but the program was still under-utilized. In , a successful small pilot providing group transit-familiarization excursions was cited to secure funding.
  • In , group transit excursion programs were well received, and 81 persons received training. Since all four excursions were fully attended, seniors requested continuation of the excursions program for .
Chosen Target
  • Increase the number of persons trained to use fixed-route public transportation, through the Bus Buddy and Mobility Training Programs.
Tactics to Close the Gap
  • Continue to work with Metro Transit’s IPA project to increase referrals of appropriate individuals.
  • Continue to receive referrals from ADRC and focal point staff to the Mobility Training and the Bus Buddy program.
  • Increase the number of referrals from teachers and case managers of high school students with disabilities to mobility training.
  • Continue to host group transit-familiarization excursions to familiarize seniors with Metro.
  • Graduates who migrate rides from Metro para-transit to accessible fixed-routes will receive a free commuter bus passes from Metro Transit.
Measures of Success
  • Increase the number of group transit excursions (4 excursions in ).
  • Increase utilization of the Mobility Training program by 20% (24 people served in ).
  • Increase utilization of the Bus Buddy program by 50% (91 people served in ).
Lead Staff Responsible
Transportation Manager; Mobility Program Specialist –
Initiative Area
Update Supported Living Guidelines so that all I/DD supported living providers share a common definition of and framework for delivering services.
Current Status
Supported Living Guidelines were last updated in .
Chosen Target
Have current, Supported Living Guidelines co-created by county staff and POS agencies to be shared at supported living coalition, posted on the County website and widely disseminated to interested parties.
Tactics to Close the Gap
  • County staff will work with supported living coalition to review and revise existing guidelines.
  • Consultant will synthesize, solicit feedback and edits then produce final document.
  • Document will be disseminated to stakeholders and posted on the county website.
Measures of Success
Supported Living Guidelines will be shared at Supported Living Summit, e-mailed to I/DD stakeholders and posted on county website by .
Lead Staff Responsible
Sue Werner –
Initiative Area
Continue the successful TimeBank Transportation Project (formerly Rural Renal Dialysis Transportation Project). Expand trip purposes to include rides for outpatient therapies, for example, chemotherapy, radiation, and physical therapy.
Current Status
  • In , DHS received a small grant from the National Center for Senior Transportation to pilot TimeBanking as a solution to providing transportation assistance to non-Medicaid dialysis patients. The pilot was successful and the funding was extended by the county.
  • In , the program expanded rides to include slightly-sedated outpatient procedures.
  • In , the Transportation Call Center received numerous ride requests for individuals requiring transportation to outpatient therapies (chemotherapy, radiation). The client is often exhausted after therapy sessions making it difficult to drive.
Chosen Target
Provide transportation to/from outpatient therapies.
Tactics to Close the Gap
  • Extend the approved trip purposes for rides provided by Dane County TimeBank to include out patient therapies.
  • Although there is demand for this service, it is difficult to estimate the number of patient and TimeBank driver connections that will take place.
Measures of Success
The Dane County TimeBank transportation program will track the number of one-way trips provided to/from outpatient therapies.
Lead Staff Responsible
Transportation Manager; Mobility Program Specialist –
Initiative Area
Continue the successful transportation options for low-income and unemployed workers in urban and rural areas.
Current Status
  • In , we created a revolving auto loan program. Three loans were processed. In , 5 loans were processed. All payments are current. In , we plan to process 4 loans.
  • In , we created a low-income job seekers program. Eligible recipients received a bus pass to job search and a second pass was given to those who successfully found employment. The program was extremely popular and funds from the approved employment transportation line were designated specifically for this program. In , 274 bus passes were distributed to job seekers. Follow up contact (successful with 85% of clients) demonstrated that 72% secured employment. In , we will distribute 275 bus passes to job seekers.
Chosen Target
  • Continue the revolving auto loan program which is tied to fiscal literacy classes and ride-sharing programs. Loans will provide transportation to low-income families and improve their credit ratings upon complete repayment of their loans.
  • Continue the low-income job seekers program.
Tactics to Close the Gap
  • Provide zero interest car loans to low-income working families in 2016. Ride-sharing and fiscal literacy classes will be a requirement of the program.
  • Distribute one monthly bus pass each to unemployed job seekers and an additional pass to those who successfully find employment.
Measures of Success
  • Provide at least four additional loans in , for a total of 12 outstanding loans.
  • Loan repayment will be current on 83% of outstanding loans.
  • 100% of the loan recipients will be registered with a state or federal ride-sharing database.
  • Provide bus passes to 275 job seekers. Provide a second bus pass to those who find employment.
  • At least 80% of persons receiving bus passes will be successfully contacted for follow up, and at least 65% of contacted individuals will have secured employment.
Lead Staff Responsible
Transportation Manager; Mobility Program Specialist –
Initiative Area
Continue to enhance the Comprehensive Community Service (CCS) infrastructure to better meet the needs of the program.
Current Status
  • CCS Providers have reported major concerns and issues with the CCS Module for several months. There are episodic difficulties with access. Parts of the system are still under construction, making staff work flow more challenging. The billing processes are not yet automated and providers lack the ability to generate meaningful reports to track revenue cycle.
  • Many individuals are enrolled, but we are limited in our ability to enroll the number of clients interested and in need of services due to limited service facilitation agency capacity. Wait times for services are increasing.
Chosen Target
  • A user-friendly IT system that allows providers easy access, confidentiality and accurate billing for CCS services provided.
  • Increased availability of service facilitation and substance abuse service providers.
Tactics to Close the Gap
  • Meet with IT staff informing them of the gaps and issues related to the module.
  • Train and fully implement an improved IT system to track data, case notes, billing and payments.
  • Market to service providers to expand service options.
  • Provider training.
  • Outreach to individuals.
  • Reach out to providers to increase the amount of substance abuse and service facilitation services.
Measures of Success
  • Ability to reliably open the module on the first attempt.
  • Ability to enter case notes and billing codes without problems.
  • Accurate reimbursement that coincides with the billing that was entered and ability of providers to run necessary reports to verify revenue cycle.
  • Expand service facilitation and substance abuse service providers by 25%.
Lead Staff Responsible
Julie Meister; Carrie Simon; Mary Grabot –
Initiative Area
Adult Protective Services
Current Status
  • In , 6% of the elder abuse and neglect (EAN) reports were referred by law enforcement. It is believed that law enforcement comes into daily contact with elders where there is an EAN concern.
  • When a person agrees to serve as guardian she receives 1-2 pamphlets defining their ongoing responsibilities. These pamphlets contain a minimal amount of information regarding the roles and responsibilities of a guardian.
Chosen Target
  • Law enforcement is aware of APS and EAN resources for elders.
  • Guardians have resources and are knowledgeable about their responsibilities.
Tactics to Close the Gap
  • Provide two trainings to law enforcement and EMS staff. One training will be with EMMCA focusing on East Madison and Monona emergency responders. The second training will be with Fitchburg Senior Center staff to focus on Fitchburg emergency responders.
  • A folder will be created for guardians outlining what a guardian needs to know in their new role.
Measures of Success
  • The number of referrals from law enforcement will increase in comparison to referrals received in .
  • By , a folder with information on responsibilities (Orders, WATTS, how to seek assistance, etc.) for guardians will be created.
Lead Staff Responsible
  • Shari Gray-Dorn, APS Supervisor; EAN staff; EMMCA and Fitchburg Senior Center focal point staff –
  • Shari Gray-Dorn, APS Supervisor, and AGP staff –

Work Plan – Badger Prairie Health Care Center

Initiative Area
Service Delivery
Current Status
Over the last 7 years, the facility received 2 Immediate Jeopardy citations (, ) and in other years had average to slightly better than average surveys (compared to national average). In , the facility exceeded regulatory expectations by receiving fewer and less severe violations compared to national average.
Chosen Target
Continue with regulatory results that are better than industry averages (total number and scope/severity).
Tactics to Close the Gap
  • Expand internal quality assurance efforts to anticipate and correct weaknesses ahead of regulatory review and to comply with new federal QA standards.
  • Enhance staff communication, standardize cross shift and report.
  • Increase role/responsibility of unit nurses in regard to the full scope of unit outcomes.
  • Continue and expand informal training regarding nurse leadership.
  • Constructive feedback and development as part of staff evaluation process.
Measures of Success
Regulatory outcomes that are consistently better than the industry standard.
Lead Staff Responsible
Bill Brotzman/Dee Heller/Jean Katzer –
Initiative Area
Reduce the percentage of county revenue needed to support BPHCC’s annual budget.
Current Status
Lost time results in increased overtime expense to cover vacated shifts, and also results in increased expenses paid toward worker’s compensation.
Chosen Target
  • Reduce the number of lost time injuries within the work place.
  • Achieve an injury rate that is below the national average.
Tactics to Close the Gap
  • Improve the quality and quantity of staff training.
  • Improve communication regarding work safety expectations.
  • Improve injury reporting/handling procedure.
  • Create a culture in which safety is paramount.
Measures of Success
  • Reduce number of injuries with lost time.
  • Reduce worker’s comp expenses.
Lead Staff Responsible
Bill Brotzman/Dee Heller/Laura Ferguson –

Work Plan – Children, Youth and Family

Initiative Area
Alternate Care
Current Status
Alt care utilization levels are very satisfactory. However, pressures mount as the county population grows and changes. Institutionalization pressures mount as consumers’ treatment issues intensify too. Alt care dollars’ needs compete with community-based services dollars’ needs. Data shows that children are more stable when placed with relatives.
Chosen Target
  • Maintain alt care utilization (ADP totals) at current levels (or better).
  • Maintain institutional numbers (RCC + DOC ADP totals) at current levels (or better).
  • Increase use of relative placements.
Tactics to Close the Gap
  • Maintain community-based services at satisfactory levels (see 5.b./next).
  • Require training of foster parents to enhance skills so as to maintain placements.
  • Increase recruitment and licensure of relative caregivers.
Measures of Success
  • Alt care utilization (ADP totals) is the same or lower than .
  • Institutional numbers (ADP totals) are the same or lower than .
  • The number of licensed relative caregivers increases by at least one each year.
  • A minimum of 15 foster parent trainings are offered.
  • Increase in the number of relative placements.
Lead Staff Responsible
Division Administrator Bob Lee; Alt Care Mgr. Marykay Wills; other managers –
Initiative Area
Community-Based Services (CBS; internal and purchased)
Current Status
The CBS array is very good, but it must be continually reviewed to assure it is meeting changing consumer needs.
Chosen Target
CBS meet consumer and agency needs.
Tactics to Close the Gap
  • Support CBS as alternatives to placements, provide adequate support to these services, maintain continuum of services.
  • Monitor CBS as to clientèles, models, and outcomes; address issues as necessary.
  • Consider Baker-Tilly recommendations as to support of essential services.
Measures of Success
The CBS array will be at levels or higher with respect to funding and key outcomes in child protective services (maltreatment recurrence), juvenile justice (maintaining youth in the community), mental health (continued development of school-based MH services), AODA (youth receiving Adolescent Alcohol Drug Assessment Intervention Program Services), and alternate care areas (ADPs).
Lead Staff Responsible
Division Administrator Bob Lee; all managers –
Initiative Area
Prevention and Early Intervention (P/EI) and Youth Development (YD)
Current Status
CYF devotes significant monies to P/EI and YD services. These are recognized as essential elements of the continuum. They face budget cuts, however, as they are not mandated services.
Chosen Target
CYF will maintain a strong commitment to P/EI services—including strong internal JFF, ECI, and YD programming—in this and future years.
Tactics to Close the Gap
  • Support P/EI services commitment in budget process.
  • Assure value of these services by close monitoring.
  • Maintain JFF, ECI, and YD programming at current levels; increase if possible.
  • Maintain AmeriCorps support, programming.
Measures of Success
  • Maintenance of current internal / external P/EI programming levels (average 8% of budget over past five years); increase if possible.
  • Maintenance of internal JFF, ECI, and YD programming at current levels; increase if possible.
  • Maintenance of AmeriCorps support, programming.
Lead Staff Responsible
Division Administrator Bob Lee; Prevention Services Manager Connie Bettin; JJ Manager Andre Johnson; Community Programs Manager Ron Chance –
Initiative Area
Implement Early Childhood Initiative (ECI) program expansions, refinements.
Current Status
ECI has offices in three Madison locations (Allied, Southwest, and Leopold) and Sun Prairie. (Southwest staff flexes to serve Verona as well.) Additionally, ECI has created Early Childhood Zones (ECZs) to coordinate home visitation (HV) programming in Leopold (Madison), Sun Prairie, and Verona. Zones offer employment and training & housing assistance to the various partners.
Chosen Target
  • Integrated ECZ programming across partner agencies.
  • Increased numbers of clients with satisfactory employment.
  • Increased numbers of clients in stable housing.
  • Single point-of-contact to coordinate placement of families in most appropriate HV programs.
  • ECZ with well-formulated performance metrics for purposes of measuring ECZ performance and garnering additional supports.
Tactics to Close the Gap
  • Develop Connector position: issue RFP for vendor, select vendor, and hire employee.
  • Provide orientation and guidance across partners as to ECZ training and jobs component.
  • Provide orientation and guidance across partners as to ECZ housing component.
  • Create a single point-of-contact to best match ECZ families with appropriate HV programs.
  • Define, adopt, and measure ECZ performance metrics.
Measures of Success
  • ECZ Connector vendor is selected and employee is hired.
  • All ECZ partners refer HV clients to the employment component.
  • All ECZ partners refer HV clients to the housing component.
  • ECZ performance metrics are operational.
Lead Staff Responsible
Community Programs Manager Ron Chance –

Work Plan – Economic Assistance and Work Services

Initiative Area
Increase FoodShare and Employment Training (FSET) enrollment to meet state average.
Current Status
Our rate of enrolled able-bodied adults without dependents (ABAWD) in FSET hovers between 18-22%, as compared to 25-30% Statewide.
Chosen Target
Enrollment rate of 30% or more by the .
Tactics to Close the Gap
  • More proactive outreach to encourage enrollment and community engagement to educate FoodShare members about the consequences of not complying with the work requirement.
  • Better partnerships and co-enrollment with Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) partner programs.
Measures of Success
Our rate of ABAWD enrollment is comparable to the State average.
Lead Staff Responsible
Gwen Hannes –